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Auditions for our 2020 production of

will take place on Thursday 2 May 2019

KELLY HALL, VICTORIA STREET, PORTRUSH

All Children’s Auditions starting at 6.30PM
Brat and Poor Baby, Featured Children and Children’s Chorus

Adult Auditions starting at 8.30PM
ALL those wishing to be considered for Principal and Minor Roles should attend. If you have auditioned in 2018 for Whistle Down the Wind, your score will still stand and there is no need to re-audition, unless you wish to better your score or audition for a different part. E.g. those who feel more confident of a higher score or wishing to change or add to the role they auditioned for in 2018. ALL scores from last year will stand.

CURRENT ADULT BDG MEMBERS do not have to audition for the Company Ensmeble, but do need to register to be considered for inclusion in the show. We do not have an infinite number of available places in the ensemble, so it is vital that you fill out your registration form on the night of 2nd May. Thank you for your co-operation in this.

It is worth pointing out that mid-teens (age 14-16) may audition for Principal Child roles, Featured Child roles, Children’s Chorus and also for Company Ensemble – but will be very dependant on heights, which one you qualify for.

BUT, FIRST, A FEW IMPORTANT POINTS:

  1. All Principal Cast roles are considered on “playing ages”. If you look the age – you could play the part. Therefore asking what age do you need to be to play ???? is a difficult question to answer. You could be 18 and play 14, you could be 30 and play 18. Make-up Dept can make characters look older, so you could be 20 and play a much older character.
  1. There will be two Children’s Troupes and they will alternate performances. The following rules will apply for casting the Children’s Troupes  
    • Children’s chorus should be P4 or over in Sept, A younger child, confident in performance, may be considered at the Director’s discretion.
    • Children P4 – P7 and Year 8 and 9 will perform alternate performances.
    • Featured Children in Year 10, 11, or 12 will perform in every show.
  1. Due to the Children’s Troupes being strictly “number limited” we will be auditioning everyone again. It is only fair to point out at this stage that not everyone will be successful, even if they have been in previous productions, as we can only cast a certain number of children and within a very specific age and height restriction.

Auditions will be held for the following roles:

The Man (Male lead) – Who is he? Is he an escaped convict or is it Jesus? He must have the power to move the audience emotionally. A very demanding role. He must fit the classic ‘Jesus’ description to be credible.

Dialogue (with Swallow)
Dialogue 2 (with Swallow)
Song and Dialogue

Boone – Age around 35-45. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) Father of Swallow, Brat and Poor Baby. He is a poor farmer who has very recently lost his wife, trying to cope with bringing up his strong willed children. Excellent singer and actor required, who possesses a good deep southern accent.

Song and Dialogue

Swallow (Female lead) – Mezzo Soprano – The oldest child of Boone. She has a playing age of 16. An adult of 18+ plays this part. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) She develops an unbreakable emotional bond with the man. This must be an experienced actress for such a demanding and highly emotional role. She must have a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue (with Amos)
Dialogue (with The Man)
Dialogue 2 (with The Man)
Song

Brat – Middle child. Playing age of 12-14. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) She dreams of having all the good things in life that the family can’t afford. This should be an experienced young actress, confident singer who possesses a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue and Song

Poor Baby – He has a playing age of 10-12. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) He doesn’t like being the youngest. He must have a good deep southern accent and good diction. Good acting is required.

Dialogue and Song

Amos –Playing age of 18 –20. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) He’s a bit of a rebel and wants to escape the humdrum life of “small town America”. Must have a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue and Song (with Candy)
Dialogue (with Swallow)
Dialogue (with Candy)

Candy – Playing age of 18 –20. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) Mezzo-soprano She wants to flee the town with Amos, who she is besotted with. She’s also a bit of a rebellious girl, born on the wrong side of the tracks. Must have a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue and Song (with Amos)
Dialogue (with Amos)

Edward – Playing age of 30-35. (Please see note on “Playing Age”) Farmhand on Boone’s farm. Not the most educated soul – but deeply religious and very protective of the children. Must have a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue
Song

Sheriff – Baritone – Not to be messed with. Good acting required. Controls the town with an iron fist. Must have a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue
Dialogue 2
Song

The Minister – sings the opening number of the show! Must have good commanding presence on the stage and hold the audience in his hands. Must have a good deep southern accent.

Dialogue
Song

Snake Preacher – Tenor. A fanatical, religious preacher who preaches “Hell and Damnation”. Needs to be able to control his congregation and drive them into a religious frenzy.

Dialogue
Song

Earl – Bass – A worker with the “Revival Meeting”. This is a young man with a playing age of around 18-25. (Please see note on “Playing Age”)

Dialogue
Song

NOTES:

Playing ages

‘Playing ages’ indicated are what they say – ‘playing ages’ – the actors can be of any age provided they look the part!

In relation to Brat and Poor Baby’s ‘playing ages’: The actors can be of an older age than ‘playing age’ – height, acting ability and good voices are the criteria – not the ‘ages’.

In any event Swallow will be taller than Brat, who, in turn, will be taller than Poor Baby.

Parents, take note!

The two actors chosen for Brat and Poor Baby will play alternate shows. Therefore we will have 4 children for these parts. They will understudy each other, so they should be available for all shows should the need arise.

Ensemble

I know we are not auditioning ladies’ “parts” as such, but I cannot stress it enough that the ladies have a hugely important role in this show. If we do not have enough adult voices we will be unable to proceed with the production.
There are opportunities for dancing for the teenager section of the adult ensemble with a swinging rock and roll number in the show.

Audition material

Audition material is available by clicking on the links below each character names

Accents:

All accents for this show MUST be Deep South Louisiana!
I would recommend that you purchase/download the original cast-recording soundtrack (double CD) and get practising. This applies to children too who will have spoken parts in the show.

Children’s Chorus Selection

The basic requirement for “Whistle Down the Wind” to work is the age and stature of the children who form the chorus. They are young, and innocent, fully believing the man in the barn is Jesus and ready to protect him at all costs.

Age and Height restriction for Children’s Chorus:

Heights will determine whether a “child” can be on the children’s chorus or in the company ensemble. (If they are in the company ensemble, they will need to be available for each performance).
• We anticipate that all children in the children’s chorus will be NO TALLER than 5’ (155cms).
• There will be two slightly taller older children to take the roles of featured girls.
• All children must be in P4 – Year 12 at the time of selection. Anyone in Year 13 and 14 may be considered for the company ensemble.

Each troupe will alternate performances.

Featured Children’s Parts

These children will sing “No Matter What” and use this Monologue for dialogue audition.

These will be assigned for each troupe.
A few of the older, taller children will do all shows; otherwise, there will be 2 children assigned for the younger “Featured Children”.

Girls:
Charity
Elizabeth
Vikki
Louise
Lavonne
Ramona
Jackie

Boys:
Louis
Clarence
Curly
Winston

Each of these children should be good character actors, have strong singing voices and who can carry the “Deep South” American accent. Whilst there is plenty of movement in all the children’s numbers, there is no dancing involved in “Whistle Down the Wind”, so there will be no dance audition.

We realise that some children will not qualify to be part of this current show – and for that we are sorry, but there will be other shows which we hope to be able to include them in again.